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Historic and Folkloric Mobile in 2006

Fort Condé, and Fort Blakely


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & AFV Winter 2006 & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Skyline

Skyline


January 3, 2006

Today we toured Mobile.

I visited the Mobile area in 1959 with my parents when Bob was going through Flight training in Pensacola. It was a rainy day and I didn't take many photos.
Park in Mobile 1959

Park in Mobile 1959

Squirrel

Squirrel


But we did stop to take a photo of
Crossing the River Styx

Crossing the River Styx


On our snowbird travels, we've driven through Mobile a couple of times when we were going from visiting our daughter in Miami to visiting our daughter in Texas.

We only actually stopped and toured Mobile this year. We drove over on the Alabama scenic trail through Fairhope.
Going through Fairhope

Going through Fairhope

Fairhope

Fairhope


U.S.S. Alabama on the way to Mobile

U.S.S. Alabama on the way to Mobile


Approaching the tunnel

Approaching the tunnel


One of Mobiles many one way streets

One of Mobiles many one way streets


We had lunch at Wendy's, It was OK, but I wasn't too impressed with it.
Inside of Wendy's

Inside of Wendy's


Bob likes the milkshakes at Wendy's. They call them Frosty's there.
Frosty

Frosty


So that is what he usually gets. And he also usually gets a hamburger and fries. I like cheese with my hamburger, so I get a cheeseburger or a bacon cheeseburger
7493647-Hamburger_Mobile.jpgCheeseburger and Fries

Cheeseburger and Fries


I also like the chili on a salad, and the baked potatoes. I had a soft serve sundae for dessert.
Ice cream dessert

Ice cream dessert


Toilet in Wendy's ladies room

Toilet in Wendy's ladies room


Historic Trail pointing to the U.S.S. Alabama in the harbor

Historic Trail pointing to the U.S.S. Alabama in the harbor


Street in Mobile

Street in Mobile


Downtown map

Downtown map


The Welcome Center was in Fort Conde - and it was free, so that was where we went next.
Welcome Center and Historic Museum gate

Welcome Center and Historic Museum gate

Gate from the inside

Gate from the inside

Cobblestones

Cobblestones

Courtyard

Courtyard


Fort Conde has an interesting museum about the history of the fort and the area.
Photo collage in the visitor's center

Photo collage in the visitor's center


Sign about the wharf that extended from the fort into the river

Sign about the wharf that extended from the fort into the river

Building inside the fort

Building inside the fort


Fort Condé was built by the French.
model of the fort at one time

model of the fort at one time


Originally Fort Condé and its surrounding features covered about 11 acres of land. It was built of local brick, stone, earthen dirt walls, and cedar wood. Twenty black slaves and five white workmen did initial work on the fort. From 1723 to 1763 Fort Conde defended the eastern most part of their Louisiana colony. It was named in honor of Louis IV's brother.
Historic Fort explanation

Historic Fort explanation


From 1763 to 1780, the English occupied Mobile and renamed the fort Charlotte for King George III's wife. Did you know that George Washington asked the Spanish governor of New Orleans to attack the British garrison at Fort Charlotte? He wanted to have Mobile and Pensacola on his side in the Revolutionary War.
896011732680961-Diorama_of_t..ort_Mobile.jpgDiorama of the Spanish occupation of the fort

Diorama of the Spanish occupation of the fort


There are explanations of the Spanish siege of Fort Charlotte.
Siege of Fort Charlotte sign

Siege of Fort Charlotte sign


From 1780 to 1813, Spain ruled Mobile and the fort was renamed Fort Carlota. In 1813, Mobile was occupied by United States troops and the fort again named Fort Charlotte. In 1820, Congress authorized the sale and removal of the fort and by late 1823, most above ground traces of Mobile’s fort were gone.
Cannon on the fort wall

Cannon on the fort wall

You May Fire When Ready Gridley

You May Fire When Ready Gridley


The current fort isn't the original of course. It is a reconstruction at 4/5ths scale of about 1/3rd of the original 1720s French fort. It was opened on July 4, 1976 as part of Mobile’s United States bicentennial celebration. If the full sized fort was present today, it would take up large sections of downtown Mobile.
Map of original fort and explanation

Map of original fort and explanation


Original fort outline superimposed on the current city of Mobile

Original fort outline superimposed on the current city of Mobile


Being as Mobile is on the Gulf Coast, even in the winter you can find flowers blooming.
Roses blooming against a sheltered fort wall

Roses blooming against a sheltered fort wall


The fort museum contains historic artifacts of Native Americans and Europeans and dioramas
Fort model

Fort model


and maps which illustrate the history of the fort. Offshoot exhibit rooms called Lifeways that give visitors a taste of what Colonial life was like. There are pictures of the officer's quarters and the armory as well as a diorama of the occupation by the Spanish
Enlisted quarters

Enlisted quarters

Officer's quarters dining

Officer's quarters dining

Gunner's room

Gunner's room

Rifles in the Armory

Rifles in the Armory

Armory Infantry stores

Armory Infantry stores

The Stockade

The Stockade

6da72dc0-396e-11ea-bd80-530d32b2a737.jpgTools

Tools

Guns

Guns

Cypress well digging device

Cypress well digging device


They placed this heavy cypress ring into the sand and then put heavy sandstone blocks on the top of it. Then they could dig out the middle without the sand seeping back into the hole.
Wall and fence

Wall and fence

Entrance gates from on the wall inside

Entrance gates from on the wall inside


From the fort there are views of the traffic in the river
Ship from the fort ramparts

Ship from the fort ramparts

CSX railroad tracks from the fort

CSX railroad tracks from the fort


(and the road traffic coming out of the tunnel right next to the fort.Looking down on the tunnel from the fort

Looking down on the tunnel from the fort


Bus leaving the green umbrella bus stop from fort

Bus leaving the green umbrella bus stop from fort


Bob didn't want to go, but I decided to ride the little electric bus around downtown Mobile anyway. They call this a trolley service (although it has no rails) It is available Monday through Friday from 7am - 6pm and Saturday from 9am - 5pm. There are 22 stops, including businesses, Law offices

Law offices


Government Plaza,
Mobile Government Plaza

Mobile Government Plaza

6962534-Mobile_Government_Plaza_Mobile.jpgMobile Government Plaza

Mobile Government Plaza


the courthouse, city hall,
Southern Market - City Hall

Southern Market - City Hall

restaurants,
Detail of building at Dauphin and Royal - Cafe Royal

Detail of building at Dauphin and Royal - Cafe Royal


bars, shopping, parks, hotels
Historic Holiday Inn

Historic Holiday Inn


and the fort.
Corner tower from the outside

Corner tower from the outside


The stops are marked by Green Umbrellas.
Green umbrella at the bus stop

Green umbrella at the bus stop


At that time, it was FREE
Picture of the bus/trolly

Picture of the bus/trolly


Mobile has eight historic districts
Memorial sculpture to Jean Baptiste LeMoyne Sieur de Bienville (he founded the first capitol of French Louisiana on the Mobile River)

Memorial sculpture to Jean Baptiste LeMoyne Sieur de Bienville (he founded the first capitol of French Louisiana on the Mobile River)


Church Street | Lower Dauphin (LODA) | Oakleigh Garden District | Old Dauphin Way | Leinkauf |Ashland Place | MidTown

Since Mobile was bounced back and forth between the Spanish and the French, Mobile has the same kind of wrought iron lacework as you see in New Orleans.
wrought iron balcony

wrought iron balcony


There is a driving tour map.
Historic area map

Historic area map


2 South Water Street Daniels, Elgin & Co. Building, circa 1860. The front of the Elgin Building is one-of-a-kind in Mobile. It is a cast iron facade ordered from the catalogue of the Badger Iron Works Co. in New York and installed on a brick building.
Elgin Building detail

Elgin Building detail


The facade is based on the waterfront palazzos of 15th and 16th century Venice. The facade was designed by T. H. Giles.

4 South Claiborne Street Cathedral Of The Immaculate Conception, 1834-49, 1890, 1895
The Cathedral serves as the seat of the Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile. Dating from 1703, this congregation is the oldest in the Central Gulf Coast region. Designed by Claude Beroujan, the Cathedral is sited on the Colonial burial grounds. Although the cornerstone was laid in 1834, financial problems delayed the start of construction until 1842. The dedication was held on December 5, 1850.
Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception

Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception


Various members of the Hutchisson family of architects also worked on the building: cornice and roof (1849); portico (1872-1890); and towers (1890-1895). The Cathedral features German art glass windows by Adolph Meier, a bronze canopy over the altar, and 14 hand-carved stations of the cross. A number of bishops who have served Mobile rest in the crypt under the floor toward the front of the church. The surrounding cast iron fence from Wood and Miltenberger of New Orleans dates from 1860

Build in stone, the Spira & Pincus Building has rusticated sills, lintels and pilasters on the second and third floors.
Pincus Building

Pincus Building


The facade also contains a heavily bracketed overhanging cornice and Neoclassical capitals.

In the1820s Mobile was becoming a developing seaport, and the only Methodist mission here was a thriving “hive” of activity. Hence the nickname “Bee Hive”
Methodist Church sign

Methodist Church sign


Construction of the church at Government and Broad was begun in 1906 and completed in 1917, featuring not one but two stained-glass domes, plus the largest (and still beautifully functional) two-manual pipe organ. The priceless domes and sanctuary windows were created by the foremost medieval translucent art-glass architect, Harry Goodhue, of Boston. The façade of the building itself contains an elaborate panoply of Baroque styled early Christian symbols.
Facade of Government Street Methodist Church

Facade of Government Street Methodist Church


In addition to the trolley-bus tour, we drove around and I took more photos
6962523-Historic_Buildings_Mobile.jpgHistoric Buildings

Historic Buildings

6962528-Historic_Buildings_Mobile.jpgHistoric Buildings

Historic Buildings


Mobile's Modern building

Mobile's Modern building


We kept ending up at the
2681021-Mobile_Convention_Center_Mobile.jpgArthur R. Outlaw Mobile Convention center

Arthur R. Outlaw Mobile Convention center


which is not only big but very modern iconic architecture.
591450636960837-pedestrian_w..ter_Mobile.jpgPedestrian walkway to Convention Center

Pedestrian walkway to Convention Center


So I have several photos of it from different angles.The center was originally built in 1978 but was expanded in 1994 - it now has 317,000 square feet of space in two exhibit halls (total 100,000 square feet), sixteen meeting rooms, and two ballrooms (total 15,500 square feet). There is also 45,000 of outdoor spaces with views of both Downtown Mobile and the Mobile River
6960836-Convention_center_Mobile.jpgConvention Center

Convention Center

Then we drove out via Historic Blakely Park in a town called Spanish Fort.
100_4214.jpgHistoric Blakely Park

Historic Blakely Park


Blakeley State Park is a park located on the site of the former town of Blakeley in Baldwin County, Alabama on the Tensaw River delta.
Entering the park

Entering the park

Pagoda in the State Park

Pagoda in the State Park

Blakely Cemetery

Blakely Cemetery


The park encompasses an area once occupied by settlers. Later, Confederate soldiers were garrisoned here and fought in the last major battle of the U.S. Civil War against superior Union forces. The park is part of the Civil War Discovery Trail due to it being the site of the Battle of Fort Blakeley,
Battle of Blakely

Battle of Blakely


with surrender just hours after Grant had defeated Lee at Appomattox on the morning of April 9, 1865. Some remnants of battlefield operations remain including the Confederate breastworks that cross the park.
Breastworks trail sign

Breastworks trail sign

100_4208.jpgBreastworks

Breastworks

large_100_4213.jpgUnpaved road in Spanish Fort

Unpaved road in Spanish Fort


Then we drove back to Gulf Shores.

We had dinner at Original Oyster House: Since 1983 which was now open.
Oyster Bar

Oyster Bar


Maybe it was closed before because it was Monday, or maybe it was because it was New Years. Apparently there is also a branch in Mobile on Battleship Parkway which was opened two years after the original Original in 1985. They have Early Bird specials, and are smoke free. They also have a large Oyster shopping area.
Oyster shopping

Oyster shopping


The Original Oyster actually bought the Bayou Village Shopping Center (where the original Original is) in 1995.
Bayou Village

Bayou Village


Restaurant entrance

Restaurant entrance


Their website says: "Nestled along the shore of the beautiful Gulf Shores bayou, Bayou Village is a quaint specialty shopping center with great stores including Birkenstock Shoes and Patagonia Sportswear."

Although the sun sets very early in January, we were able to watch the last little bit of the sunset
Sunset

Sunset


from our table. I had
Shrimp au Gratin with hush puppy and toast $13.99

Shrimp au Gratin with hush puppy and toast $13.99


Bob had a salad bar and gumbo
Bob's gumbo (with salad bar) $8.50

Bob's gumbo (with salad bar) $8.50


The bill before tip was $23.69

I took 277 pictures, and Bob took about 6.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 18:15 Archived in USA

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Comments

The well digging device is quite deft. Do you think that they made new one for every well so they wouldn't need to lift the "original" from the bottom after the well-digging?

by hennaonthetrek

I think they would have to do a new one for each well and it would probably be easier to do that then to dig out the old one without destroying the well.

by greatgrandmaR

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