A Travellerspoint blog

I'm Tired and I Want to Go Home

Our last Armed Forces Vacation week


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & AFV Winter 2006 & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Friday 3 March 2006

After the Repositioning cruise October 23rd to November 10th, we left home on December 12th. We've been gone almost three months. I'm tired of traveling and want to go home. So I didn't have all that much enthusiasm for seeing another museum or an old house.

But I did have several goals for this area - I wanted to go to the Lexington Horse Park, because when we were there before, the truck was being used for camping and it was difficult to move it so I didn't have any way to get anywhere except by walking. I have no pictures except for the competition. I wanted to see the different breeds of horses and see the things that visitors at the Horse Park, and also see a little of Lexington.

Prequel:

Back in the 80s my four children were in Pony Club. Typically held every three years at the Kentucky Horse Park, the Pony Club Festival is a week-long celebration of Pony Club that brings together more than 4,000 Pony Club members (and their families) from across the country. Its purpose is to provide a National Championships competition. Now the competition includes not only Dressage, Combined Training and Show Jumping but also Mounted Games, Polocrosse, Tetrathlon and Quiz. Regions will send teams or members of mixed team to compete. To attend, you have to qualify at the regional level. Armbands which include a current copy of the individual’s USPC medical card must be worn at all times while on the competition grounds. For the championship, you bring your own horse and all his equipment.

We would drive down to KY hauling a horse trailer. We stayed in the truck camper on the edge of the grounds and walked everywhere.
Pickup camper

Pickup camper


My son competed in tetrathlon (swimming, running, shooting and riding). My daughter's team won first place in the eventing competition over 20 some teams from all over the US. Eventing is a three phase competition - Dressage
Dressage ring (halt and salute) and barns

Dressage ring (halt and salute) and barns


Cross Country
Cross country

Cross country

Horses being jogged for soundness after Cross Country

Horses being jogged for soundness after Cross Country


and Stadium Jumping
Stadium jumping

Stadium jumping


Horse jumping down into a grob

Horse jumping down into a grob

Eventing stadium jumping at the 83 Championship

Eventing stadium jumping at the 83 Championship


Daughters 1st place team - she's second from left

Daughters 1st place team - she's second from left


The team was composed of 4 riders and a stable manager. On the left of this photo is a girl named Beth riding a 17 hand horse named Chester that was loaned to her. Next is my daughter on a large pony named Questionable Mark (stable name Quest). The third member is a younger girl named Jen and her medium pony Apple Pan Dowdy. The fourth rider was Melanie on a grey (i.e. white) horse named Chance.
Victory Gallop in main ring

Victory Gallop in main ring

Quest and Chance n the stable area afterward

Quest and Chance n the stable area afterward

End Prequel

I remembered that Robert Carson Hewett (Bob's great great grandfather) was buried in Louisville, and thought I would look at his grave. I looked the grave site up on the internet and found the locations. I wanted to visit Churchill Downs (I would have liked to go to the races, but the museum would be next best) and I wanted to see if I could see other Carl Brenner paintings like we have in person (I've seen some of them on the internet).

Our_Brenner_painting

Our_Brenner_painting


And as long as I was here, I thought I'd go see Frankfort, the capitol. I understand it was made the capitol because it was midway between Lexington and Louisville and they couldn't decide between those two. And I thought we might explore the area around the dam which is responsible for the big lake.

So the tentative schedule was to go to Louisville Saturday because the cemetery office was not open on Sunday, and the museums were not open on Monday. Then Sunday or Monday we would go to Bardstown and take a trolley tour, Tuesday we would go to Frankfort and Wednesday we would go to Lexington.

Saturday 4 March 2006

I painstakingly looked up all the names I had that I thought might be buried at Cave Hill, and found that the Andersons (Robert Carson Hewett's wife was an Anderson) were buried in the next plot. They were Section M Plot 230 and 228. I talked to the cemetery people on the phone and got directions, and then we didn't go that way.
Taylorsville, Spencer County water tower

Taylorsville, Spencer County water tower


We stopped about 12 for lunch,
Spicy Chicken sandwich from McDonalds

Spicy Chicken sandwich from McDonalds

Dessert

Dessert


and then went to the cemetery.
Homes

Homes

Civil War monument

Civil War monument

Bottom of the Confederate monument

Bottom of the Confederate monument


We found the cemetery OK, but had to follow the wall all the way around it before we could find an entrance.

Entrance gates

Entrance gates


I stopped at the guard booth to get a map, but he told me to go into the office for one.
Statue outside the office

Statue outside the office


After we got the map (it is a VERY large place), we drove up to that section
Road in Cave Hill Cemetery

Road in Cave Hill Cemetery


and discovered that there were some graves there that we didn't expect.
Road beside the family graves

Road beside the family graves


Both the mother and father of J. Sidney Anderson Hewett (Bob's great great grandmother) were there along with several of her siblings and their spouses and children. R.C. Hewett had a large obelisk in the center of his plot.
RC Hewett's obelisk and Anderson graves

RC Hewett's obelisk and Anderson graves


I found out later that R.C. Hewett was one of the directors of Cave Hill. The large obelisk not only had his name and J. Sidney's names on two of the sides, but also Mary Hewett Beasley's brother (Edward Anderson Hewett) and his wife Ida Ainslie, and the brother's son (Ainslie Hewett) and his wife.

In addition to the map to our family graves, there is also a map to show you the graves of famous people that are there. One of the famous people is

Harland Sanders (1890-1980) who is perhaps one of the most recognized personage in the world. At an age when others contemplate retirement, he set out to franchise his pressure-cooked fried chicken.
large_7e081920-5a68-11ea-b77d-bd50c2c1b80d.jpg
When the Colonel (by governor’s commission) sold Kentucky Fried Chicken in 1964, the company continued to market his image on every corner of the world. He made many rich in business and his quiet philanthropy made many well-particularly children

There are 3 different Guided Walking Tours: Historical; Horticultural; and Modern section. All dates are on Sundays, and the tours begin at 1 pm.

  • Historical: Cost of this walking tour is $25 / person, reservations are required in advance
  • Horticultural Driving:
  • General Overall Driving:

The Speed Museum where the Brenner painting is was closed for a big dinner that night, so we went on to Churchill Downs
Homes near Churchill Downs

Homes near Churchill Downs


and went into the museum (Churchill Downs-The World's Largest Equine Museum) as there is no racing there at the moment.
Lineup of cars under mezzanine

Lineup of cars under mezzanine

2827346-Views_of_Churchill_Downs_Louisville.jpg
63 Days to the Derby (March 2006)

63 Days to the Derby (March 2006)


There were a lot of very interesting exhibits. The exhibits in the museum included a starting gate setup with saddled horses in it,
Starting Gate

Starting Gate

Starting gate description

Starting gate description


and some interactive exhibits including a "Place Your Bets" exhibit that illustrates pari-mutuel wagering and the "Warner L. Jones, Jr. Time Machine" that permits visitors to select footage of Derbys as far back as 1918. One can even be a jockey and ride in a race. I didn't try that.
I took a picture of the band uniform with an M on it because I thought that might stand for Maryland.
Band costume

Band costume


I couldn't figure out what it would be doing in Kentucky.

I was interested in the silver cups,
Silver trophies

Silver trophies


and the jockey silks were very colorful.
Jockey silks

Jockey silks

Recreation of the Winner's Circle

Recreation of the Winner's Circle

Blacksmithing exhibit

Blacksmithing exhibit


Grooming equipment and tack

Grooming equipment and tack

Horse conformation exhibit

Horse conformation exhibit


There was some artwork done by children, and apparently there are rotating art exhibits by children because there was one when we were there.
large_x100_8657.JPG
"An equine-related art competition with works submitted by students from Jefferson County public, private and parochial schools. All the artwork reflects the Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs or the Thoroughbred racing industry and captures the rich tradition and heritage of the Kentucky Derby"

Incidentally, Thoroughbred is a breed of horse like a poodle is a breed of dog. Thoroughbreds are purebred, but not all purebred horses are thoroughbreds. Purebred horses can also be Appaloosas, Saddlebreds, Standardbreds (trotters or pacers), Pintos, Quarter Horses (originally bred to race a quarter of a mile), Shetland Ponies, Morgans, Arabians, Trakehners, Clydesdales, and many other breeds. The only kind of racing at Churchill Downs is Thoroughbred racing, but other breeds of horses (Arabians, Standardbreds and Quarter Horses for instance) race at other tracks in other areas of the country.
2824811-Racey_Louisville.jpgGift shop

Gift shop


We saw the movie which is a 360 degrees around you. You are supposed to stand in the middle and the movie surrounds you - different pictures come on at different places in the circular screen. I was able to get some pictures of the presentation.
Theatre from above - showing race on one screen

Theatre from above - showing race on one screen


The museum website describes the movie as follows:
The Kentucky Derby Museum is a premier tourist attraction, featuring an award-winning, High Definition Kentucky Derby film entitled "The Greatest Race". Displayed on a 360-degree screen, "The Greatest Race" places the viewer in the center of Derby Day action.
Stable worker coming to work

Stable worker coming to work

Three screens with panorama extended on all 3

Three screens with panorama extended on all 3


Stable row at the racetrack

Stable row at the racetrack

Electric starting gate from the film

Electric starting gate from the film

The sun goes down (panorama)

The sun goes down (panorama)

Daily schedule

Daily schedule


The tour of the track was included in the admission price to the museum and we took it because we could not go to see races as we had at Oaklawn in Hot Springs.
Under the grandstands

Under the grandstands


large_2829138-Parking_Louisville.jpg
The track site says that grave sites of three famous Kentucky Derby winners, Carry Back (1961), Swaps (1955) and Brokers Tip (1933) are located outside on the museum grounds. I don't recall that we saw the graves. There is also supposed to be a TB (Thoroughbred) and a miniature horse on the grounds, but we did not see them either.

We saw the Grandstand, the Finish Line and Winner's Circle. The guide told us about the saddling enclosure,
Saddling enclosure

Saddling enclosure


and showed us (from outside) where all the owners boxes were.
Stands from the track side

Stands from the track side


Stands

Stands

You are here

You are here

Derby winner jockey

Derby winner jockey

Statue of the first Derby winner Aristides (1875)

Statue of the first Derby winner Aristides (1875)


Infield

Infield


The tour included the actual Finish Line pole used at Churchill Down for many years.
Finish Line

Finish Line


First tour 9:30 am; Last tour 4:15 pm. Obviously most of the tours are not available during Derby Week (the first week in May)

There are additional tours that you can pay for, but we didn't take any of those. This includes the

  • INSIDERS' TOUR Museum tour guides take up to 20 guests on a one-hour behind the scenes tour of the Jockeys' Quarters, Millionaires' Row, the Press Box and other areas of Churchill Downs' newly renovated clubhouse.
  • The BACKSIDE TOURS (AVAILABLE MARCH THRU NOV)

Museum tour guides take up to 12 guests on a one-hour tour of Churchill Downs' stable area and infield. There are also two stops for picture taking, time permitting.
Leaving Louisville

Leaving Louisville


We got back about 3:30 and ate our leftovers for dinner. I spend a lot of time in the office doing the internet as the office is not open on Sunday.

Sunday 5 March 2006

This was Bob's 70th birthday, but I haven't been able to figure out what to give him as a present, and he keeps saying not to bother.

Bardstown was included in the book A Thousand Places to See Before You Die. It's where Stephen Foster was reputed to have had in mind when he wrote "My Old Kentucky Home"
Downtown historic district (sign behind tree)

Downtown historic district (sign behind tree)


Although it was very cold, I did wander around the Bardstown Historic District, which is a registered historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. The district consists of twenty-six blocks with a total of 279 properties. Prominent architecture located within the district include the Cobblestone Path, Nelson County Jail, Old L & N Station, Old Talbott Tavern, and Spalding Hall, all individually on the National Register, and the historic old Nelson County Courthouse. I did get photos of the Jail, the Courthouse and the Tavern. And I also photographed the library
Nelson County Public Library

Nelson County Public Library


The historic sign in the photo says
Sign about the county

Sign about the county


COUNTY NAMED 1784 for Thomas Nelson. 1738-89.
Member Va. House of Burgesses.
In the first Provincial Convention, 1774:
Continental Congress, 1775-77 and 1779.
Signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Commander of Va. Militia, 1777-81.
Governor of Va., 1781.
Commended for selfless patriotism in ordering guns to fire on his own home, the British headquarters, at Yorktown 1781.

The Bardstown sign says:
Bardstown Sign

Bardstown Sign


BARDSTOWN
William Bard laid off the town and granted two acres for erection of courthouse and other public buildings in the name of his brother David who remained in Pennsylvania. The first courthouse, of hewn logs, was built 1785; by then the town was called Baird's Town, a variation of family name.
It was designated Bardstown when incorporated in 1788

This is a sign in the main town square which says: The first successful amputation of a leg at the hip joint in US.
880275542831858-Stephen_Fost.._Bardstown.jpgSuccessful surgery sign

Successful surgery sign


Done here by Dr. Walter Brashear in 1806 without any precedent to guide him. The patient was a seventeen-year-old boy whose leg had been badly mangled. Dr. Brashear was born in 1776 came to Kentucky 1784 and studied medicine under Dr. Frederick Ridgely of Lexington. He died in 1860
Map of Bardstown posted in the town square

Map of Bardstown posted in the town square

Confederate Raids and Invasions sign

Confederate Raids and Invasions sign


This was a cold raw day, and my objective was to take the trolley tour of the town. When we got there at 1:20, the trolley was sitting there
Bob walking toward the trolley from the Welcome Center circle

Bob walking toward the trolley from the Welcome Center circle

with blinking lights and there was a piece of paper sticking out of the door that said next tour 1:30. The driver never came. Someone suggested that the driver might be watching the UK vs Miami basketball game but when I inquired there, no one would admit to seeing him. The website says:

Trolley departure times change seasonally. No Tours on Monday
2831681-Trolley_from_the_website_Bardstown.jpgTrolley parked

Trolley parked


Hop on-board this vintage-style trolley and tour around the sites of Historic Bardstown (Kentucky’s second oldest city) including Heaven Hill Distilleries Bourbon Heritage Center. The new Heaven Hill Distilleries Trolley operates year-round; fully narrated tours last approximately one hour and 15 minutes.

Jan. – Feb. no Sunday tours - It was Sunday, but this was March

So I got my history from the markers around town.
McClean building on the Corner of Stephen Foster Ave - also East 62

McClean building on the Corner of Stephen Foster Ave - also East 62


This remarkable commercial building was built in 1820 for the brothers Samuel & Hector McClean, patterned on examples found in Philadelphia & Baltimore. Each ground floor room could serve a separate purpose with the southwest room designed for the Bardstown Post Office... There was a commercial ballroom with elegant woodwork and dressing rooms.
1820 McClean commercial building

1820 McClean commercial building

Harrison Smith House c 1795-1815

Harrison Smith House c 1795-1815


The Harrison-Smith house was apparently for sale in 2013. Realtor's listing for the house includes:

The west limestone section of the home is the oldest, and the east brick section was added around 1820. The home served as a Civil War Union recruiting site during the war and was also home to several doctors that lived and worked in the property. Perhaps most well-known was Dr. Burr Harrison, who with Dr. Walter Brashear in 1806 made medical history in surgical hip-joint amputation. The medallion cornice unites the homes exceptional facade. Mature trees and recently added courtyard adds charm and outdoor living/entertainment space, while an enclosed patio offers a secret oasis. Step inside and you are beckoned with 3 stories of finished living space, stunning hardwood floors throughout, a handsome staircase, tall ceilings & windows, and 5 fully functional fireplaces
Sign about the Harrison Smith House

Sign about the Harrison Smith House


The sign in the photo says:
"One of the oldest houses in Bardstown, the west side stone portion has to date from before 1795. On one side of the 'settled lots', improved by Samuel Duncan under the lottery terms of settlement, it was the residence of both William Pope Duval and his brother-in-law, Dr. Burr Harrison after 1800. In the 'crayon papers', author Washington Irving recorded the early 'real-life' adventures of young Duval. One famous incident, "The Stolen Kiss", which ultimately led to his marriage to Nancy Hynes wad believed by family members to have probably taken place at his home. William Pope Duval went on to become a famous lower and member of the Pleiades Club, famous for its renowned members. In 1822, Duval was appointed the first territorial governor of Florida by President Monroe, re-appointed under Adams and Jackson. After 1860, Dr Alfred Smith practiced medicine here with an office on the west end of the house. His descendants continued in the home as residents through the year 2000."
Old Talbot Tavern

Old Talbot Tavern


Town website said:
Built in 1779, this restaurant is the oldest Western stagecoach stop in America. The historic stone building has been a silent witness to an amazing panorama of events and an unending parade of visitors from kings to pioneers and presidents to renegades.
The sign on the side says:
Sign

Sign


The stone portion of the Talbott Tavern dates before 1790 - probably built to serve as Salam Academy. The first owner of record about 1800, Wm. Rose Hynes began to add brick wings to the stone part. He started the tavern operation with the first license about 1805. It became known as the Hynes House, serving as a stage coach stop on the Louisville-Nashville Turnpike through the 19th century.

Another west side brick wing was added about 1840 and the resulting lobby area was enclosed by George Talbott in 1905. During his tenure the Hynes House became the Talbott Tavern. It has now operated continuously for 100 years offering food, drink and lodging to the travelers and guests from all over the world, both famous and commoner.
Jailer's Inn

Jailer's Inn


The tour of the town includes the original 1819 jail. All furnished with antiques and heirlooms. A chilling look at conditions in this jail that was in operation until 1987. The Old Nelson County Jail property, housed prisoners from 1797 till 1987. The front building, sometimes referred to as the "Old Jail" was constructed in 1819. Records indicated that John Rogers architect of St. Joseph Cathedral, performed certain carpentry on this structure. The upper floor of this native limestone building, with 30 inch thick walls, contained two cells and an "upstairs dungeon" to house prisoners.

The back stone building, sometimes referred to as the "New Jail," was built in 1874 and is completely surrounded by a stone wall. The front jail was then; made into the jailer’s residence. Both the jail and jailer’s residence were used and occupied until 1987. It was the oldest operating jail complex in the state of Kentucky and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places.
Ad

Ad


The Inn website says:
Iron bars on windows, 30 inch thick stone walls, and a heavy steel door slamming behind you may not sound like the typical tourist accommodation and Jailer’s Inn is anything but typical. ..

Each of our six guest rooms are beautifully decorated with antiques and heirlooms, all located in the renovated front jail. The back jail, built in 1874, is basically unchanged; you get a chilling and sobering look at what conditions were like in the old Nelson County jail that was in full operation as recently as 1987.

On spring and summer mornings, as you sip hot coffee and chat with other guests over a full breakfast in the courtyard, it’s difficult to imagine all of the previous uses of the courtyard—as a work yard for prisoners crushing limestone, a place to visit forlorn relatives, or even the centralized location of the Nelson County gallows.

I gather that the so-called "Greatest Show on Earth" at the Old Stable Restaurant isn't the circus, although that's where I've always heard that phrase applied. The Great Show is the "Mountain Dew Hillbillies"
Home of The Greatest Show on Earth!

Home of The Greatest Show on Earth!


The website says: .."but maybe being from where you are, you do not know what Hillbillies look like. But I will say, they are genuine. With their best pair of overalls and blue jeans, and socks and shoes to match (depending on what day of the week); they are sure to charm and entertain your group with their humor and musical talent." At the end of the meal, they pass out songbooks and have a sing-along.

Just in case you know what hillbillies are, but do not know what Mountain Dew is - it is a soft drink. I do not know whether the actually serve it at this restaurant or not.
"The evening buffet consists of three meat entrees and five vegetables with coleslaw and dessert. Price is $27 per person (inclusive) and includes the Hillbilly Hat and Songbook. A Kentucky Mint Julep or a non-alcoholic Mint Julep Punch in a Keepsake Glass may be added, totaling $32 (inclusive) for the Super Party Package. In recent years, there has been a pronounced trend to do the whole package as tour planners have recognized what a tremendous evening this is and what a good way to put a good feeling in your group to start off a tour or a great way to sum up a tour."
Sign out front

Sign out front


Since it was Sunday, the number listed in the visitor's guides didn't answer and the old courthouse which was now the visitor's center in the center of the square was locked up tight. Someone let me and another couple in. It was warmer in there, but the best we could do was pick up some brochures
x100_8679.JPGCourthouse/Welcome Center Tower and Courthouse entrance

Courthouse/Welcome Center Tower and Courthouse entrance

Welcome Center entrance entrance

Welcome Center entrance entrance

Memorial on grounds to servicemen who "offered their lives in the service of our country during W.W.I - W.W.II - Korean and these during the Vietnam Conflict

Memorial on grounds to servicemen who "offered their lives in the service of our country during W.W.I - W.W.II - Korean and these during the Vietnam Conflict


The horse-drawn carriage was doing tours. But Bob felt that it was too cold for that, even though they had plastic over the carriage to protect from the wind.
Carriage in the town square

Carriage in the town square


There does not appear to be a website for this organization, but town website says: Open daily. Go back in time with a narrated, horse-drawn carriage tour through Historic Bardstown. Group tours available.

So we drove out to My Old Kentucky Home State Park. This was Federal Hill, the home of John Rowan who was a cousin of Stephen Fosters and where he was supposed to be staying when he wrote "My Old Kentucky Home".
Visitor's Center entrance

Visitor's Center entrance

View into the store

View into the store


There was a big painting or quilt in the visitor's center and it was not allowed to take a picture of it. I can't find it on the internet anywhere either. It was a kind of collage of S. Foster's life.
Model horses for sale

Model horses for sale


I looked for a gift for my mom, but didn't find anything, and I can't find anything specific on the internet about what they have for sale here. It just says: The park’s gift shop features Kentucky handcrafts for gift-giving and decorating.
The house was being renovated but the tours were going on anyway. No pictures inside of course
From the visitor's center

From the visitor's center

House from the road

House from the road


Federal Hill is a Georgian style mansion that originally had 13 rooms. The number 13 is repeated throughout the house, supposedly to honor the 13 colonies at the time of America’s independence from Great Britain. The front of the home has 13 windows, and there are 13 steps to each floor of the house. Completed in 1796, the rear wing of the house contains a kitchen, two bedrooms, and a smokehouse. The first floor has a dining room, parlor, and library. The second floor has bedrooms, and the third floor contained the nursery. The house is built of brick and has six large rooms that are 22 feet square. Ceilings are 13-1/2 feet high. The floors are made of yellow poplar and the walls are 13 inches thick.
Statue of Stephen Foster

Statue of Stephen Foster


So I wandered around outside and took some pictures,
Graveyard

Graveyard

Monument outside on the grounds

Monument outside on the grounds


This monument is in the Kentucky state park.
John Rowland's monument

John Rowland's monument


It says
Born July 12, 1773.
York Co. Pennsylvania
Died July 3, 1843
in Louisville KY.
He served his country with honor
with inflexible integrity and extrictism
in the convention which formed
the constitution of Kentucky.

Then we went back to the condo.
Round hay bales in Bloomfield

Round hay bales in Bloomfield


We decided to go to the On The Way Cafe (the little restaurant on the corner near the condo)
On the Way Cafe

On the Way Cafe

Specials

Specials


and we had quite good
Orange Chicken and Rice with a side salad $6.95

Orange Chicken and Rice with a side salad $6.95


The sheriff and several other law officers were eating there too. It seemed to be an informal meeting place for them.
large_2824849-Small_Town_by_the_Dam_Taylorsville.jpgSheriff's car

Sheriff's car


Monday 6 March 2006

A cold, wet, dreary day, and I just did not feel like doing anything. I had planned to go to a park near Elizabethtown, but we just did not do it. I did call the cemetery about some graves that I could not read the stones, and found that there were 5 or 6 people buried there that had no stones.

When we went to the On The Way Cafe on Sunday (yesterday), I saw that there were specials each day. On Monday it was spaghetti and meatballs, so that is what both Bob and I ate on Monday
Dinner special $6.95

Dinner special $6.95


When I went to go to the office to do the internet, the outside door was locked. I called the number on the door, and it turned out that the brother of the girl that works the front desk was renovating the apartments in this unit and the previous week someone had stolen all his tools (plus the TVs and VCRs etc). He stays in one of the ground floor apartments during the week (his sister gives him a ride) and then she gives him a ride home on the weekend. So he came and let me in, and then moved his tools downstairs into the locked area.

Tuesday, 7 March 2006 - Visiting Frankfort

I was told that Frankfort was chosen as the state capitol because it was approximately halfway between Louisville and Lexington which both wanted it.The name probably came from an altercation where one of the pioneers, Stephen Frank, was killed near here. The crossing became known as "Frank’s Ford." Later this name was shortened to Frankfort.

There are two capitol buildings - an old one and a new one.

By the turn of the century, it was evident to Kentucky government officials that a new capitol building was needed

After Kentucky had lost six State Houses to fire, the government began to search for a design that did not rely upon wood as the main construction component. In 1827, the Kentucky Legislature sponsored an architect's competition, the winner receiving the bid to design the new Kentucky Capitol building.

Gideon Shyrock, a young Lexingtonian and former student of Philadelphia architect William Strickland, won the competition. The exterior building plan, based on the Greek Revival style, was patterned on a Greek temple, with grand Ionic columns and massive pediment. The entire structure was to be constructed of "Kentucky marble," a form of crystalline limestone found near the cliffs overlooking the Kentucky River.

This is now the Old Capitol, which is part of the downtown museum complex Here you can explore more than 200 years of politics, architecture, enterprise, misbehavior, and everyday life in Frankfort at the Capitol City Museum. Free admission..
Bob walking in to the Salato Wildlife Center

Bob walking in to the Salato Wildlife Center

Kentucky map with donors listed

Kentucky map with donors listed


First we stopped at the Salato Wildlife Education Center. (Free - donations welcome) This had a very nice natural history type of museum
Stuffed birds in the rafters

Stuffed birds in the rafters


Inside the Center

Inside the Center


explaining the river sheds,
Watershed map with rivers lighted

Watershed map with rivers lighted


the geology and the native animals (some stuffed specimens) and plants of the region including some aquaria and Aquarium with turtle

Aquarium with turtle


one of the tanks had a HUGE antediluvian looking turtle.
Snapping turtle

Snapping turtle


There were also some mating toads
Mating toads

Mating toads


and
large_2841354-Wildlife_Warnings_Frankfort.jpg
live specimens of the three types of venomous snakes of the region (Please do not tap on the glass) - Copperhead, Cottonmouth and Rattlesnake.
See the diamonds?

See the diamonds?

2841352-Wildlife_Warnings_Frankfort.jpgSnakes

Snakes


There was a sign at the entrance which warned about invasive species.
Invasive plant warning

Invasive plant warning


Bird feeder outside the big windows

Bird feeder outside the big windows

Animals at the bird feeder

Animals at the bird feeder


Outside of one of the center's windows there were some bird feeders where I saw cardinals, blue jays, red winged blackbirds and a dove, plus a squirrel and a chipmunk on the ground.
Be safe! No Wading or Climbing on Rocks

Be safe! No Wading or Climbing on Rocks


The Salito Wildlife Center gave us a little leaflet to guide us around the outdoor enclosures. Included among the warnings was this one:
"Bears are always hungry - please do not feed the bears if you come upon one in the wild"
2841355-Wildlife_Warnings_Frankfort.jpgBear

Bear


Habitrek is a short nature trail through the woods and fields behind the Dragonfly Marsh. It is a "primitive" trail which features a sinkhole, rocky karst outcrops,
Water feature

Water feature

Behind waterfall

Behind waterfall

large_2840489-Rescued_Animals_Frankfort.jpgGar

Gar


and a variety of native trees, shrubs, and wildflowers. A 3-acre field along the way has been converted from fescue to native prairie grasses and wildflowers to provide better habitat and attract more wildlife for viewing.
Dragonfly Marsh

Dragonfly Marsh


The entire trail is only a mile and is an easy walk for most, but wear good walking shoes. The Pea Ridge Loop Trail is a 3-mile trail that branches off from the already existing, 1-mile HabiTrek Trail and is rated moderately strenuous to the average hiker.
Bird sculpture outside bald eagle exhibit

Bird sculpture outside bald eagle exhibit


In the little zoo area outside were some 'non-releasable animals, like a bald eagle with only one wing.
Bald Eagle with one wing

Bald Eagle with one wing


There was a little leaflet that explained about the various animals, which included
Bison

Bison

Elk

Elk

White tailed deer

White tailed deer

2840492-Lynx_Frankfort.jpgBobcat/Lynx

Bobcat/Lynx


and wild turkey. We saw all of them except the turkeys, but we did not walk any of the trails.

When we drove on toward Frankfort, we stopped at an overlook and I took some pictures of the capitol.
Capitol through the trees

Capitol through the trees


2839532-New_Capitol_Frankfort.jpgNew Capitol from the overlook

New Capitol from the overlook


There were signs about the capital (building, places to see, history of Franklin County) on the overlook. Places to see in Frankfort

Places to see in Frankfort


Frankfort sign

Frankfort sign



FRANKFORT
__________
Site Surveyed July 16, 1773
Founded By
General James Wilkinson
Chartered by
Virginia Legislature Oct., 1786
Chose Capital of Kentucky
December 1792

Overlook historical sign

Overlook historical sign


I heard music being played over the loudspeaker, but didn't know exactly why. When we drove down into the town, we found out. There was a march from the old capitol to the new capitol by the AFL-CIO who were demonstrating about (I don't know whether they were for or against) a Right To Work law that was being proposed or voted on.

There were bands and the whole bit. But that meant that we couldn't drive to the capitol or go across the bridge.
Bridge

Bridge

Frankfort Scenes

Frankfort Scenes


So we went back and went across another bridge
Old Capitol

Old Capitol


and eventually came to another place where the parade was blocking us off. So about 12:33, we parked in a free lot next to Frankfort's Union Station. The last passenger train ran in 1971.
large_2843172-Frankfort_Scenes_Frankfort.jpg
We crossed the apparently unused RR tracks to the Kentucky Historical Society Kentucky History Museum, which was something I had intended to visit anyway. We went to the Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, but the admission also includes the Kentucky Military History Museum and Old State Capitol.
Hours Open Tuesday – Saturday 10-5
Adults $4
Youth (6-18) $2
Children 5 and under receive complimentary admission

The museum:
The Fifteenth State

The Fifteenth State


is divided into eight main areas, chronicling life in Kentucky from prehistoric times to the present: First Kentuckians (10,000 BC-AD 1750),
An exhibit of plows

An exhibit of plows


The Kentucky Frontier (1750-1800),
Furniture

Furniture


The Antebellum Age (1800-1860)
Kentucky silversmith work

Kentucky silversmith work

large_100_8817.JPG
War and Aftermath (1860-1875), Continuity and Change (1875-1900)
A Kentucky 'fiddle'

A Kentucky 'fiddle'

Bottles on display

Bottles on display


The New Century (1900-1930),
Depression and War (1930-1950), and
Many Sides of Kentucky (1950-today).
Another area, Pure Kentucky, highlights the lives and contributions of famous Kentuckians through artifacts, from a boxing robe worn by Muhammad Ali...

They told me I could take photos as long as I did not use a flash but a lot of the photos that I took are a little dark. After we went around the exhibits, I asked one of the docents for a recommendation for lunch. She told us about Gibby's,
Facade of Gibby's from across the street

Facade of Gibby's from across the street

Closeup of the windows

Closeup of the windows

Looking out toward the street

Looking out toward the street

Menu board

Menu board


so we walked down the street to have lunch. I had a
Three cheese sandwich ($4.50) and Apple Waldorf Salad ($1.95)

Three cheese sandwich ($4.50) and Apple Waldorf Salad ($1.95)


I also got a small drink, thinking that I would get root beer. But they were out of root beer and also out of unsweetened tea, so I had a mixture of lemonade and sweet tea. Bob got a 1/4 lb. chili dog and fries.
Chili dog and fries

Chili dog and fries


Then we went back to the museum which also had a research library. I could bring my computer in to the library (I had it in the trunk of the car), but I could not bring in my camera, and had to leave any jackets or pens (because of the problem of marking up the hard copies), or any packages in a locker. So we put the computer case and my jacket in the locker. It was 25 cents, but there was a quarter in the slot already and when I unlocked the locker to get the case out, the quarter went back into the slot for the next person.

I wanted to get a better copy of Robert Carson Hewett's obituary from the Courier Journal, but they did not have the years 1880 to 1900, and RC Hewett died in 1891. I did find a copy of his will however, and also the will of Mary Anderson (his wife's mother). According to the list of wills, there was a will for R.C. Hewett's wife, but they did not have that roll of microfilm. It was 30 cents a copy to copy it and I had to buy a copy card for $1, which would do 3 copies - they charged 10 cents for the card. I put in $2, and after I copied both wills, I had 10 cents left on the card.

Meanwhile, Bob walked around Frankfort, and took my camera (which I left in the trunk of the car because I couldn't use it in the library) and took a photo of the hand dug railroad tunnel which was next to the station, and also the sign about it. I had already taken a photo of the train station and the sign for that
Hand dug tunnel

Hand dug tunnel

Early Tunnel in Kentucky sign

Early Tunnel in Kentucky sign


Two of the signs pictures are transcribed below.

Early Tunnel in Kentucky
____________________
Early transportation tunnel in Kentucky. It was hand bored by Lexington and Frankfort Railroad in 1849. First passenger train went through on February 24, 1850. Replace incline. built 1835 just east of here, previously used by railroad to enter Frankfort. Incline built by Lexington & Ohio, the first railroad in Kentucky.

Frankfort Union Station

Frankfort Union Station

Frankfort Union Station

Frankfort Union Station

Railroad tracks in the street

Railroad tracks in the street


Frankfort Union Station
________________
Built by Louisville & Nashville RR 1908, to replace depot located here by Lexington & Frankfort R.R. in 1850s. Present station was used by Chesapeake & Ohio, Louisville & Nashville, Frankfort & Cincinnati,and Kentucky Highlands. The last scheduled passenger train was C&O George Washington, April 30, 1971
.
John hampton House

John hampton House


I wanted Bob to go to the Old Capitol, but he didn't tour either the Old Capitol (which was included in the museum price) or the military museum.
He did go into a couple of art galleries.

The library closed at 4, and I barely made it after copying the two wills.

We drove out via the current State House.
Street level

Street level

large_n100_8839.JPG
It is the fourth permanent building since statehood in 1792. There is also a Floral Clock in front of the building. The face of this colorful flowering clock is 34 ft across and is planted with thousands of plants. For good luck, toss a coin into the fountain. Hours are dawn to dusk.
Dead Clock

Dead Clock


But the Floral clock is completely dead and out of commission this time of year.

Then we went back to the On The Way Cafe

large_x100_8842.JPGlarge_n100_8843.JPGand had the special of meat loaf. with mashed potatoes and gravy and vegetables for $5.95.
Meatloaf dinner without gravy $5.95

Meatloaf dinner without gravy $5.95


I told them not to put the gravy on the meatloaf so I just had it on the mashed potatoes. I had a root beer float for $2.25 to make up for not having any root beer this afternoon, and Bob had a hot fudge sundae - also $2.25
large_x100_8846.JPG
Wednesday 8 March 2006

large_2851659-_Kentucky_State_Horse_Park.jpg
Today we drove to Lexington. It was a cold grey day, threatening rain with a little spitting sometimes. First we went to the Horse Park. I tried very hard to book a tour of the horse farms and historic Lexington, but they all said they had to have a least 4 people. It was off season of course which meant that there wasn't much going on, but I thought I could go up and look in the breed barn.

Your general admission ticket includes a Horses of the World presentation and a 10- to 12-minute narrated trolley tour of the main activities area pulled by a team of Draft Horses (winter tours are pulled by tractor).
Trolley Tour in 1983 which I didn't get a chance to take

Trolley Tour in 1983 which I didn't get a chance to take


2851606-Entrance_gates_Lexington.jpgEntrance to the park

Entrance to the park


So when we got there, there was no one taking admissions, so we went in and stopped at the statue of Man O War..
Looking down a walkway

Looking down a walkway


The Kentucky Horse Park has a bronze sculpture of Man O War (one of the most famous horses in the world) . The statue was sculpted by Herbert Haseltine (1877-1962). He is buried here, alongside the Triple Crown winner War Admiral (his son). The African American jockey, Isaac Burns Murphy, is also buried nearby. Man O'War won 20 of 21 races lifetime, and is considered by many to be the greatest thoroughbred of the 20th century

The park website says:

Man o' War was one of 1,680 Thoroughbreds foaled in 1917. .. Man o' War's sire was Fair Play, by Hastings, both of whom were mean and temperamental, but excellent weight carriers. To provide balance to Fair Play's temper, Belmont bred him to Mahubah, by Rock Sand who had won the British Triple Crown. Her ancestors were even tempered and intelligent.

He was named by Mrs. Belmont, "My Man o' War" because he was a war baby. But when August Belmont was serving in the Army in 1918, he ordered his entire crop of yearlings sold at Saratoga, so he did not profit from his breeding success.
Man O War statue

Man O War statue


On June 6, 1919, ridden by Johnny Loftus, Man o' War won his first race by six lengths, crossing the finish line at a canter. He showed his desire to be a front runner and never liked to have any other horse in front of him. Legend has it that upon seeing him in action, a spectator asked a groom, "Who's he by?" The reply was "He's by hisself, and there ain't nobody gonna get near him." He ran only in expensive stake races for the remainder of his career. As his wins built up, so did the weight he was required to carry. By his fourth race, Man o' War was carrying 130 pounds, a very great weight for a two-year-old.

The statue originally stood over his grave on the grounds of Faraway Farm, where he died in 1948. Both his grave and the statue were moved to the Kentucky Horse Park in 1977.

The plaque nearby says:
Sign about Man O War

Sign about Man O War


MAN o' WAR
Fair Play-Mahubah, by Rock Sand

Greatest race horse and leading money winner of his day. Winner of twenty of twenty-one starts with lifetime earnings of $249,465. Foaled March 29 1917 at August Belmont's Nursery Stud a few miles away. Sold at auction as yearling for $5000 to Samuel D. Riddle, his owner throughout his racing career and later retirement. "Big Red" sired 62 stakes winners; his get earning over $3.5 million. War Admiral, Triple Crown winner was most famous of his offspring. Man o' War died Nov. 1, 1947; lies buried between this statue by noted sculptor Herbert Haseltine.

On the other side:

RACES WON BY MAN o' WAR
2 Year Old, 1919

Futurity
Tremont
Grand Union Hotel
U.S. Hotel
Hopeful
Youthful
Hudson
Keene Memorial
Purse Race at Belmont

Won all entered as 2 year old except second in Sanford Memorial

3 YEAR OLD, 1920

Belmont
Potomac
Dwyer
Preakness
Jockey Club
Stuyvestant
Kenilworth Gold Cup
Travers
Lawrence Realization
Withers'
Miller

Won all entered as 3 year old, eight in record time.

Plaque presented by The Thoroughbred Club of America

No one seemed to care where we went, so at my distracted direction, Bob drove all over the grounds. We went past the Pony Club Headquarters (which was closed),
Pony Club Headquarters

Pony Club Headquarters


past the American Saddle Horse Museum. The statue of Roxie Highland by George F. Yostel is located outside of Roxie Highland was a famous American Saddlebred Horse who is buried on the Park
167700232851671-Saddlebred_M..Horse_Park.jpgSaddle Horse Association with statue of Roxie Highland

Saddle Horse Association with statue of Roxie Highland


past the USEF offices (which was not closed but we didn't go in),
United States Equestrian Federation

United States Equestrian Federation


past the dressage rings,
Rings for dressage

Rings for dressage


grandstands across the water

grandstands across the water


past the Big Barn,
Big barns

Big barns


past the long lines of stabling,
Barns in the winter

Barns in the winter


past the riding stable
Riding stable

Riding stable

Raising the Bar

Raising the Bar

World Equestrian Games site

World Equestrian Games site


past the Grill on the Hill (closed)
Grill on the Hill

Grill on the Hill


past the building for officials,
Officials building

Officials building


all around a race course
2851656-_Kentucky_State_Horse_Park.jpgracetrack

racetrack

large_2851658-_Kentucky_State_Horse_Park.jpg
on the outside and past the Clubhouse restaurant.
Clubhouse

Clubhouse


No one challenged us at all.
3756790-Kentucky_Horse_Park_Lexington.jpgRolex clock outside one of the houses

Rolex clock outside one of the houses

Rolex Four StarThree Day-

The Rolex is the only **** 3 Day event in the Americas. It is part of the Grand Slam of eventing. (The other two are Badminton Horse Trials in England the first weekend in May and the Burghley Horse Trials in England the first of September.) The Grand Slam has only been won once, by Pippa Funnell of Great Britain (2003). My children have competed in Kentucky several times, but not at the prestigious Olympic Level three day event.
Steeplechase track

Steeplechase track

Overlooking the course

Overlooking the course


I would have liked to be here for the Rolex, but since we were here in early March, we were only able to see some of the jumps - I stood on a hill and photographed some of them from a distance.
Ascending jump (foreground) and table jump

Ascending jump (foreground) and table jump


Hanging log jump on a hill (AKA Trakhner jump)

Hanging log jump on a hill (AKA Trakhner jump)


Picture frame type jump

Picture frame type jump

Truck with volunteers building a jump

Truck with volunteers building a jump


Steeplechase type jump (brush top)

Steeplechase type jump (brush top)


large_2851655-_Kentucky_State_Horse_Park.jpg
When we walked in towards the Museum, we saw this display on Kentucky wall building. It says that KY has the most extensive network of drystone fences in America. They are constructed of native limestone and don't use any mortar to hold them together. The majority were built by Irish stonemasons. After the civil war, slaves who had been employed as quarrymen also learned the craft from the Irish.

During the early 1990's the Dry Stone Masonry Conservancy was formed to preserve and continue the art. They teach classes. The wall in the photo was made by them in 2000

Most of the field dividers in KY are now white fences. For contrast, the barns in the counties of central Kentucky, such as Mercer County, barns and fences and other farm buildings are painted black. Sometimes they are trimmed in white but are often painted completely black. This color scheme came from the tradition of using lamp black and diesel fuel as a cheap wood preservative. Black barns raise the heat inside, aiding the curing of tobacco, although in Maryland, tobacco barns are unpainted because the paint 'flavors' the tobacco.

986010582851668-Statue_of_Se..Horse_Park.jpgStatue of Secretariat

Statue of Secretariat


One of the best sculptures on the grounds is a statue of Secretariat, but he isn't buried at the horse park like Man 'O War is. The Edwin Bogucki Secretariat bronze is a life-size statue, showing him being led into the winner’s circle after his win in the Kentucky Derby by groom, Eddie Sweat with jockey Ron Turcotte in the irons. The bronze weighs 1,500 pounds and is the centerpiece of the Secretariat Plaza at the Kentucky Horse Park.
Promise and Frisky Filly

Promise and Frisky Filly


Bronze foals by Gwen Reardon frolic at the entrance to the Kentucky Horse Park Museum. Ms Reardon has many other statues at the Thoroughbred Park downtown.

So when I got to the International Museum of the Horse,
Entrance to the museum

Entrance to the museum

Park map - overhead in the museum entrance hall

Park map - overhead in the museum entrance hall


which had workers in the lobby and ladders etc,
Through the door

Through the door


I was disinclined to pay $8 to go in - I'd seen most of what I wanted to anyway. They would have someone up at the breed barn at 1:30 she said, but I didn't want to wait that long.

So we left to drive into Lexington,
Heavy Race Horse Oats

Heavy Race Horse Oats


and to try to find a place to eat. I had a detailed map of the town which had eating places on it, so we first tried to find a place there near the Un of KY but there was no place to park.
2853313-Horses_and_Universities_Lexington.jpg2853314-Horses_and_Universities_Lexington.jpg
First we stopped at a Subway in a gas station, but there was no place to eat inside, so we left.
Subway sign

Subway sign

Finally found another Subway where there was some parking.
Tow notice where we ate lunch

Tow notice where we ate lunch


Inside of the restaurant

Inside of the restaurant


One of the bad things about Subway is their lack of desserts. They DO have a very good chocolate chip cookie.
Chocolate chip cookies

Chocolate chip cookies

Regular specials

Regular specials


I had a cheese steak sub and two chocolate chip cookies. Bob had tuna salad and chips.

Next on the list was to go to the Un of KY
University of KY sign on the wall

University of KY sign on the wall


to see if there was a Carl Brenner painting. We parked in a lot near the Student Union at a meter - max time 75 cents for 45 minutes.
Parking lot in town

Parking lot in town


We had a problem parking in Lexington. On the University campus when we wanted to visit the museum and library. Because parking was so expensive, we left before we really needed to. But we really had problems everywhere.

The website says:
1. Visitors

There are four recognized types of visitors to campus. They are regular visitors, UK Healthcare patients, UK Healthcare visitors and UK Healthcare Good Samaritan visitors. (We were regular visitors) Visitors are welcome at all times and may park in the following locations:

  • Pay parking meters
  • W.T. Young Library pay parking lot
  • Pay Parking Structures #5 and #7

Looking across to the Student Union

Looking across to the Student Union

No bike riding sign on the sidewalk up to the libe

No bike riding sign on the sidewalk up to the libe


Armory type building across campus

Armory type building across campus


Art Museum

Art Museum


We walked to the Art Museum, and after some wrong turns, we found the museum, but they had no Carl Brenner there. Then we walked up to the M.I.K Library
Walkway up the the M. I. King Library

Walkway up the the M. I. King Library


(which is NOT named for Martin Luther King, but Margaret Isadora King the first librarian). They said they had microfiche of the newspapers, but I had called the Courier Journal and while it would be $12 for each obituary from them, the main library in Louisville had all the copies that I could search myself and they also had death certificate lists. So since we were parked in such an expensive spot, we decided to wait for that.

Just on a whim, I decided to go by Transylvania University, and see what was there.
Driving to Transylvania University

Driving to Transylvania University


We found a parking spot right away,
Parking lot at Transylvania

Parking lot at Transylvania


and went into the library. There the archives person said that I couldn't come and look myself, but that she would look for and send me Bob's great grandfather R.C. Hewett's thesis. Which she did.
2853307-Transylvania_University_Lexington.jpgTransylvania University

Transylvania University


So we took some pictures of the buildings and signs
2853310-Transylvania_University_Lexington.jpgTransylvania University

Transylvania University


(other Transylvania alumni include Jefferson Davis, John Hunt Morgan, Stephen F. Austin, Cassius M. Clay, John Fox Jr., 2 vice presidents, 50 U.S. Senators, 101 Representatives, three House Speakers, 36 Governors and 34 Ambassadors)
Duplex castle?

Duplex castle?


and drove back to the condo unit via Versailles
Horse van

Horse van


Welcome to Versailles (pronounced in KY as Ver Sailes

Welcome to Versailles (pronounced in KY as Ver Sailes

Wild Turkey Bourbon plant

Wild Turkey Bourbon plant


and Lawrencetown, including past the Wild Turkey plant.
Offutt-Cole Tavern - log section dates back to 1780.  Brick section 1802

Offutt-Cole Tavern - log section dates back to 1780. Brick section 1802


Street in Taylorsville

Street in Taylorsville


We never did try the Chinese restaurant, but Bob didn't want to eat at the same restaurant for the final evening, so we had dinner in the Dairy Queen instead.
Restaurant from the side

Restaurant from the side


He doesn't usually like Dairy Queen. This Dairy Queen has DQ® Burgers, Hot Dogs and BBQ Sandwiches, Chicken Strips, Chicken Sandwiches and Salads, Blizzard® Treats, Moolatte™, Cones and Sundaes and DQ® Cakes. They have a drive-through and serve DQ® Breakfast
Menu Board

Menu Board


I had
Double cheeseburger

Double cheeseburger


Salad

Salad

Mint Oreo Blizzard

Mint Oreo Blizzard


and Bob had two hamburgers and a milkshake. He loves milkshakes.

And then I went and used the computer in the main office for a bit.

Thursday 9 March 2006

This is our last day, and it is a rainy nasty day but not as cold. Our goal was to track down and view the painting by Carl Brenner that was in the Speed Museum. There is another one at Filson, but they apparently don't have it on display and there is supposed to be one in an art gallery mall but that would be a tremendous amount of trouble especially since we have no intention of buying it.

I took a photo of this historic marker on the way out. He's buried at Cave Hill.
Roscoe Goose 1891-1971 Trainer and Jockey

Roscoe Goose 1891-1971 Trainer and Jockey

We parked in the parking garage (the museum was open today) and went in.
Museum from the top of the garage (in back)

Museum from the top of the garage (in back)


The Speed Art Museum on the University of Louisville's campus is the oldest and largest art museum in Kentucky. I was interested in the collection because it includes paintings by Kentucky artists and my husband owns such a painting.

HOWEVER, there is apparently NO CATALOG of the art in the museum. This is an EXTREMELY serious flaw. I asked the girl at the admissions desk to tell me where a painting was located (which I knew was there because it was on their website), and she had no idea. Completely clueless as to where the painting might be. Had I not seen it on the website in the Kentucky section, I would not have known where to look.

The website said:

CARL CHRISTIAN BRENNER
(American, 1838-1888)

Winter, 1885
Oil on canvas
Bequest of Mrs. Elizabeth M. Gray 1958.24

Born in Germany, Carl Christian Brenner immigrated to the United States in 1853, living first in New Orleans before settling in Louisville. Considered Kentucky’s greatest artist during his lifetime, Brenner was a member of a group of Louisville painters known as Tonalists, whose use of muted color evoked mood...

Primarily a landscape artist, Brenner often painted stands of trees he observed in Cherokee Park or along River Road on the south bank of the Ohio River. While Brenner painted in his studio, he also painted outdoors, even in the coldest weather. He devised a portable hut with windows, which allowed him to paint outside in winter for extended periods of time.

I had collected images from the internet of his paintings.
Brenner painting

Brenner painting

727187b.jpgp32-01.jpgp69-1.jpgp46-0.jpg

They gave me a camera pass, and then told me that I could not take any pictures on the ground floor where the permanent collection is housed. We went to the Kentucky room and found the Carl Brenner, and I was a good girl and didn't take a picture of it. Plus there were a couple of sketches by his son, and a similar but muddier looking painting by someone called Hewett Green. There was a presentation pitcher similar to the one we have that was given to R. C. Hewett, which they said had been made by Tiffany but sold under a local silversmith's name., But then later when I went into the shop on the premises, they didn't have any information at all on Brenner. No postcards or pictures or books or any information at all on KY artists.

No one ever asked for the camera pass.
Museum from the street in the front

Museum from the street in the front


We paid for parking and left the parking garage and drove to the library.
Facade facing the parking lot

Facade facing the parking lot


It was about lunch time, but we saw no place to eat, so we just skipped lunch.
2829197-George_Prentices_statue_Louisville.jpgGeorge Prentice's statue

George Prentice's statue


The library was supposed to have wi-fi, but I couldn't make it do anything. They had a list of what birth, marriage and death certificates they had. Nothing official in the way of death certificates was available before 1911, but I did find that Joanna Sidney Anderson Hewett's mother's maiden name was Wigglesworth. I made $2.60 worth of copies at 20 cents each, including another better copy of R.C. Hewett's obituary, and several death certificates.
University of Louisville - Cardinal Baseball

University of Louisville - Cardinal Baseball


Bob meanwhile kept feeding the parking meter and looked up Carl Brenner. He found a little booklet with no illustrations for an exhibition that had been held about 15 years ago, and copied it. He also found a little bit on his son. We left the library about 3:30.
Franklin's Statue on the other side of the library

Franklin's Statue on the other side of the library


First Unitarian Church

First Unitarian Church

in 1895, Susan B Anthony and Carrie Chapman Catt spoke here promoting women's suffrage

in 1895, Susan B Anthony and Carrie Chapman Catt spoke here promoting women's suffrage


I don't remember what we did for dinner,
On the Way Restaurant

On the Way Restaurant


Tomorrow we check out and go to Charleston WV

Posted by greatgrandmaR 21:17 Archived in USA

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Comments

Have your children continued to "horse-hobby" with their kids?

I didn't know who Harland Sanders was before reading it, might have something to do with the KFC landing Finland only previous year..

What did you end up giving Bob for his birthday? Man are hard to buy gifts for, my Toni answers the same when I ask him what he wants..And I know not to bother buy anything useless..so I always try to find something he really needs.

What hillbillies had to do with Mountain Dew? :)

Salato Wildlife Education Center looks nice! I think I would have enjoyed the walking trails :)

by hennaonthetrek

Yes, Col. Sanders is KFC (which was originally Kentucky Fried Chicken.

I don't remember what I gave Bob in 2006. Mostly I have given him sweaters. This year the kids and I gave him a big flat screen TV. One of the kids sends grapefruit from Florida (where she lives).

Originally (back in the 30s when there was Prohibition - a law against alcohol), people would make their own alcohol in stills in the woods. This was called Moonshine or Mountain Dew.

by greatgrandmaR

Opps that got submitted before I was ready - Mountain Dew the soft drink was (and still is sometimes) marketed with a hillbilly theme because most of the Moonshiners (people with the stills) were from the "hills"

I don't know if that explains it or not.

My oldest child sold her horse when she went to college and her husband is against his children riding. The second child continued riding for some time but she now just rides motorcycles. My son at one time exercised horses and trained them for the track, but his wife was against his riding and she said his son was allergic.

The daughter that was in the photos has been a barn manager on a big farm, and she rode her horse as a married person. But when they moved for her husband's job, she sold him. She is now a horse judge, but none of her children are interested in riding.

by greatgrandmaR

I have give Toni a lot of clothes too, and also chargers for his phone, he is always stealing mine and when I need it I have to search where it is....

Ah,I got it confused it with the soda that has the same name. We got those "moonshine distillerys" too in the woods during the Prohibition.

by hennaonthetrek

That's a bit a shame they didn't/couldn't continue the hobby! That sounded like a fun thing for whole family to do together!

by hennaonthetrek

Mountain Dew IS a soft drink. It took it's name from prohibition whiskey, but it was originally a mixer for whiskey - not alcoholic.

My children rode, but I didn't as I am afraid of horses. I was just a chauffeur. Actually in Pony Club the kids have to do everything themselves. Parents and others are prohibited from helping and if someone gives them help, the rider/competitor is disqualified.

by greatgrandmaR

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